Pre-Scouting Senior Bowl Wide Receivers

By Eric Galko
January 20, 2013

Photo: Tom Morris

Quinton Patton Louisiana Tech

Height: 6'2" Weight: 195
Rec. Yds: 1,392 Avg: 13.4 TDs: 13

Pros

  • Tracks the ball in air at an elite level vertically
  • Subtle open-field runner, can pick up yards after catch
  • Efficient footwork to stop-start and adjust his route downfield

Cons

  • Lacks top end explosiveness to get consistent separation on shorter routes
  • Doesn’t have elite size or athleticism

Overall

One of the most efficient and productive receivers in college football the last two years, Quinton Patton does all of the little things well project as a long-term NFL receiver in a variety of systems. His ability to get upfield quickly and with decisive run-after catch moves, his elite ball tracking skill set, his diversity in the routes he’s scored touchdowns on, and his development as blocker shouldn’t take long to adjust to the NFL level.

Terrence Williams Baylor

Height: 6'2" Weight: 205
Rec. Yds: 1,832 Avg: 18.9 TDs: 12
As expected in Baylor's offense, Williams leads all Senior Bowl WRs with 24 explosive plays (25+ yards) with Hamilton a distant second (15).

Pros

  • Elite top end speed, both in getting vertical and with the ball
  • Strong hands at the catch point
  • Smooth athlete with number one receiver upside

Cons

  • Route definition could be improved, lack diverse routes/polish
  • Struggles to stay physical to get separation initially and downfield

Overall

One of the best receiver athletes in college football the past two seasons, Williams maximized the role of the Baylor Bears’ number one receiver spot. With the natural athleticism and vertical speed, Williams won throughout college relying on just those two skill sets. Despite still being raw in his routes and in being physical, he’s flashed the progression in both of those areas, and with that development along with his elite upside (that should wow at the NFL Combine), he’ll likely end in the first round discussion by Draft Day.

Markus Wheaton Oregon State

Height: 6'1" Weight: 182
Rec. Yds: 1,244 Avg: 13.7 TDs: 11
Wheaton's 9 drops and his 6.4 drop percentage is entirely too high.

Pros

  • Sinks and explodes downfield in his routes and after catch
  • Extends away from his body well
  • Improved route running throughout year

Cons

  • Bit straight-line in his speed/moves in open field
  • Poor blocker, lacks drive or extension
  • Loses focus at times on easier receptions, concentration concerns

Overall

Wheaton, who’s been a terrific athlete over his 20 starts and 49 appearances at Oregon State, began to develop more defined routes to gain separation on a consistent basis, as well as flashing the ability to use his hands and double moves to effectively get vertical. A still developing receiver, especially as a route runner, Wheaton’s progressions this year along with his vertical stretch ability should make him a great value in the 2nd-3rd round.

Aaron Dobson Marshall

Height: 6'3" Weight: 200
Rec. Yds: 679 Avg: 11.9 TDs: 3

Pros

  • Fantastic “ball-grabbing” ability to win jump balls and extend away from his body
  • Very strong hands to secure passes in traffic and along the boundaries
  • Possesses elite body control to finish catches and win jump balls

Cons

  • Doesn’t possess great explosive speed vertically
  • Could be more physical/polished when working on inside routes
  • Lack of talent at quarterback in college limits ability to evaluate his skill set completely

Overall

Dobson had the misfortune of playing with some mediocre or poor passers at his time at Marshall, and still was able to produce at a high level considering. What Dobson lacks in elite speed, burst upfield, or polish in his routes, he wows with highlight reel catches and elite body control. With his upside, he should turn out to be a better college than a pro, and could rise to the early 2nd round discussion.

Cobi Hamilton Arkansas

Height: 6'3" Weight: 209
Rec. Yds: 1,335 Avg: 14.8 TDs: 51
Hamilton's 8 drops are near the top of the "drops' list from this group while his 5 TDs is near the bottom.

Pros

  • Built well in his upper half to work in the short and mid-field routes at the next level
  • Long strider who picks up speed well in the open field
  • Gives wide target to quarterback on interior routes

Cons

  • Doesn’t extend away from his body well
  • Poor blocker, seems unwilling
  • Needs to be more physical in working downfield

Overall

With ideal size and producing with Tyler Wilson throwing him the ball, Hamilton was expected to not only be the star of the Arkansas offense, but also develop more as an NFL receiver. But his lack of extension away from his body and inability to consistently work downfield with physicality are concerning. He’ll need to prove he can overcome those two issues if he hopes to be in the 2nd round discussion.

Ryan Swope Texas A&M

Height: 5'11" Weight: 192
Rec. Yds: 1,082 Avg: 5.1 TDs: 8
Almost half of Swope's total yardage for the season (49%) came after the catch.

Pros

  • Explosive leg drive in both his routes and as an elite receiver blocker
  • Quick, developed short area routes
  • Powerful, balanced runner after catch

Cons

  • Doesn’t extend away from his body well
  • Lacks great top end speed

Overall

The former running back recruit, Swope has become a short area route technician as a receiver, while still having the strength and balance to be strong runner after catch. Likely limited to the slot at the next level, it’s his bulk as a runner and definition as a receiver that should allow him to be one of the premier slot receivers in this class.

Aaron Mellette Elon

Height: 5'11" Weight: 192
Rec. Yds: 1,082 Avg: 5.1 TDs: 8

Pros

  • Elite production over his career despite being still learning the position
  • Great balance and lower body control as a receiver/runner
  • Adjusts his hands and hips to the ball as a vertical receiver

Cons

  • Lacks great physicality when working downfield and on the interior
  • Ability to catch in traffic/interior routes concerning
  • Still raw in his route development, primarily a hitch, quick slant, or 9-route receiver

Overall

Despite just two years of high school football (partly why he landed at Elon), Mellette has gone on to be one of the most productive receivers in the country at the FCS level since 2010. However, Mellette doesn’t have elite speed, lacks polish as a receiver, and the level of competition issue (see his UNC game) won’t go away quietly. The Senior Bowl is of major importance for Mellette.

Chris Harper Kansas State

Height: 5'11" Weight: 192
Rec. Yds: 1,082 Avg: 5.1 TDs: 8
Harper was ready to make plays on 1st downs. Harper averaged 14.8 ypc this season, but 19.4 ypc on first down.

Pros

  • Physically dominate on the interior and at the catch point
  • Ideal body build, strong throughout
  • Able to break tackles in the open field as a runner

Cons

  • Lacks great top end speed
  • Rounds his route at the top of his pattern at times
  • Could position his body on interior routes better to avoid driving lane for DB

Overall

The former Oregon quarterback recruit, Harper transferred to Kansas State (closer to his hometown), and the former dual-threat QB developed the physicality and polish as a receiver to now be one of the most physical receivers in the country. With the sheer strength to win as a receiver and runner, similar to Anquan Boldin, Harper could rise throughout the process and be in the 2nd-3rd round discussion.

 

Comment

Scouting Dept.

Shamar Stephen
Overall Rank: #244

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